Faculty and Staff

UChicago campus overview

Faculty Board

A broadly based faculty board oversees the Program in Digital Studies of Language, Culture, and History. The members of this board are drawn from 18 different departments in the University of Chicago, representing every discipline in the humanities. They have a wide range of interests and experience in creating software tools for the humanities or in using and evaluating digital technology in their research and teaching.

  • Niall Atkinson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Art History and the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures. He studies the art and architecture of the Italian Renaissance, with a particular focus on the experience of artistic environments and urban spaces in late medieval and Renaissance Italy. He is the co-director of a digital mapping project on Visualizing the Changing Spatial and Social Ecology of Renaissance Florence.
  • Whitney Cox is an Associate Professor in the Department of South Asian Languages and Civilizations. He studies Sanskrit and the languages and literatures of India. He is a co-director of the multi-project CEDAR initiative.
  • Helma Dik is an Associate Professor in the Department of Classics. She studies Greek language and linguistics, Greek prose style, and corpus linguistics. She is engaged in digital projects pertaining to classical philology in collaboration with the Perseus Digital Library, one result of which is the Perseus under PhiloLogic tool developed at the University of Chicago.
  • Allyson Ettinger is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Linguistics. She specializes in computational linguistics and psycholinguistics. She uses digital methods to model and test hypotheses about mechanisms underlying the way our brains process language in real time.
  • Lenore Grenoble is the John Matthews Manly Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Linguistics and the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures. She specializes in sociolinguistics and studies language contact and shift in multilingual settings, with particular attention to Arctic Indigenous language communities (e.g., Greenlandic and Inuit).
  • Faith Hillis is an Associate Professor in the Department of History and the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures. She studies modern Russian and European history and is interested in using digital tools to answer historical questions.
  • Travis Jackson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Music. He studies ethnomusicology and jazz, rock, and world music.
  • Patrick Jagoda is a Professor in the Department of English Language and Literature and the Department of Cinema and Media Studies. He studies new media (e.g., digital games, electronic literature, etc.) and twentieth- and twenty-first century American literature and culture. He is the director of the Weston Game Lab in the University of Chicagos Media Arts, Data, and Design Center.
  • Hoyt Long is an Associate Professor of Japanese Literature in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations and co-director of the Textual Optics Lab. He studies modern Japan, cultural analytics, and the sociology and history of literature and other media. He alternates with David Schloen in teaching the Digital Studies core seminar entitled Introduction to Digital Humanities (DIGS 30007).
  • Ellen MacKay is an Associate Professor in the Department of English Language and Literature and the Committee on Theater and Performance Studies. She studies Shakespeare and other early modern English literature, and theater theory and performance. She is a co-director of the multi-project CEDAR initiative.
  • Robert Morrissey is the Benjamin Franklin Professor of French Literature in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures and co-director of the Textual Optics Lab. He studies French literature and history of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and is the director of the ARTFL Project, which sponsored the development of the PhiloLogic system for full-text search and retrieval.
  • Constantine Nakassis is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology. He is a linguistic anthropologist with interests in semiotics, film theory, mass media, brands, and youth culture. His regional focus is Tamil Nadu, India.
  • Jason Salavon is an Associate Professor in the Department of Visual Arts. He is an artist who uses software processes of his own design to produce art objects and installations that have been exhibited in museums and galleries around the world. He is the founder of the Hack Arts Lab in the University of Chicagos Media Arts, Data, and Design Center.
  • Haun Saussy is University Professor in the Department of Comparative Literature, the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, and the Committee on Social Thought. He studies classical Chinese poetry and literary theory and pre-twentieth-century media history.
  • David Schloen (Director of Digital Studies) is a Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations. He specializes in the archaeology and history of the ancient Levant and directs excavations in Turkey and Israel. He has a background in computer science and extensive experience in applying computational methods in textual and archaeological research. He alternates with Hoyt Long in teaching the Digital Studies core seminar entitled Introduction to Digital Humanities (DIGS 30007).  
  • Adam Shaw is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Computer Science. He does research on programming languages and has extensive experience teaching introductory courses in computer science. He teaches the Digital Studies core course that introduces students to computer programming using the Python programming language (DIGS 30000).
  • Jeffrey Stackert is an Associate Professor of Hebrew Bible in the Divinity School and Associate Faculty in the Department of Classics and the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations. His research focuses especially on the composition of the Pentateuch, ancient Near Eastern prophecy, cultic texts, and ancient Near Eastern law. He is a co-director of the multi-project CEDAR initiative.
  • Malte Willer is an Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy. He specializes in the philosophy of language and philosophical logic, and specifically the dynamic perspective on discourse and reasoning. In the area of digital studies, he is interested in the philosophical issues raised by artificial intelligence, including the philosophical critique of good old-fashioned AI (symbolic AI) and the epistemology of deep learning.

Director and Administrative Staff

The Director of Digital Studies is David Schloen. He is a Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, where he has been teaching for twenty-five years. He holds a doctorate in archaeology and biblical studies from Harvard University and a bachelors degree in computer science from the University of Toronto. In the area of digital humanities, he is particularly interested in the digital representation of scholarly knowledge and the philosophical issues raised by this endeavor. In close collaboration with Sandra Schloen, he has worked to craft a generic top-level ontology that can subsume heterogeneous local ontologies and enable data integration while capturing the conceptual distinctions and scholarly practices characteristic of the humanities. His ideas on this score are implemented in a data-integration platform called OCHRE (Online Cultural and Historical Research Environment), which supports all stages of research, from initial data acquisition to the final publication and archiving of the data, and allows comprehensive cross-project querying and analysis that span many disparate sources of information. 

The Associate Director of Digital Studies is Miller Prosser. He holds a doctorate in Hebrew and Northwest Semitic philology from the University of Chicago and has extensive experience in data management and data publication for the humanities involving all types of digital data, including texts, images, and maps. He administers the Digital Studies program and teaches two core courses per year: Data Management for the Humanities (DIGS 30003) and “Data Publication for the Humanities (DIGS 30005). He also provides consultation and training for the computational research of faculty and students, including support for scholars at UChicago and elsewhere who use the OCHRE platform to manage, analyze, and publish their data.

Please send email to digitalstudies@uchicago.edu.

Instructional Staff

In addition to the core courses and electives taught by the Director, Associate Director, and Faculty Board, core courses in Digital Studies are taught by the following University of Chicago staff members, each of whom has a background in the humanities and specializes in computational research:

  • Clovis Gladstone is a Senior Research Associate in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures and is the Associate Director of the Textual Optics Lab and the ARTFL ProjectHe holds a doctorate in French literature from the University of Chicago and has extensive experience in developing software for the analysis of literary texts. He is the lead developer of the PhiloLogic system for full-text search and retrieval.
  • Brooke Luetgert is a Computational Scientist for the Social Sciences in the Research Computing Center. She holds a doctorate in economics from the German University of Administrative Sciences in Speyer, Germany, and has expertise in quantitative research methods and data mining. Prior to joining the University of Chicago, she was an Assistant Professor of Political Science and Research Methodology at Sabancı University in Istanbul, Turkey.
  • Jeffrey Tharsen is a Computational Scientist for Digital Humanities in the Research Computing Center. He holds a doctorate in Chinese philology and poetics from the University of Chicago and has expertise in computational methods for philological and linguistic research and for data visualization.

Advisory Staff

The following University of Chicago staff members lead units on campus that are dedicated to supporting the digital activities of faculty members and students. They work closely with the Digital Studies faculty to provide expert advice and technical services for research projects and course instruction: